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Research & Development Medical research, Tools & technology, Formulation

Easy as C-B-C

Cannabichromene (CBC) may not be the most well-known phytocannabinoid in cannabis, but it has its moments. Take this study investigating its acute post-dose pharmacokinetics (PK) in humans.

Researchers analyzed a randomized trial investigating Spectrum Yellow oil – an oral cannabis product containing 20 mg CBD, 0.9 mg Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol THC, and 1.1 mg CBC, per 1 mL of oil. Plasma CBC concentrations were analyzed by a validated two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry assay. The results were interesting.

After a single dose and after the final dose, the Cmax of CBC increased by 1.3–1.8-fold for each twofold increase in dose. Based on the ratio of administered CBD, THC, and CBC to the plasma concentration, the dose of CBD was 18 times higher than the dose of CBC, yet the AUC0–t of CBD was only 6.6–9.8-fold higher than the AUC0–t of CBC; the dose of THC was similar to the dose of CBC, yet THC was quantifiable in fewer plasma samples than was CBC.

The takeaway: CBC may have preferential absorption over CBD and THC when administered together.

But that's not all. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) currently has no target-specific treatment, but there is mounting evidence that cannabinoids could offer relief. In an experimental model of ARDS, researchers investigated the potential protective effects of one of cannabis’ most abundant nonpsychotropics: that's right, our friend CBC. And the data look promising.

“Inhalant CBC protected lung structure, contained excessive cytokine production, and curtailed inflammatory responses both in lung and blood tissues.” Moreover, CBC appears to exert its effects through TRP cation channels, which suggests potential in other inflammatory diseases.

The researchers also note the importance of CBC delivery via inhaler in terms of translational promise: faster onset of action, smaller doses, and better efficacy-to-safety ratio than systemic therapy.

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About the Author
Phoebe Harkin

Deputy Editor

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